Archive for October, 2013

Capturing Sound can be tricky

Capturing Sound can be tricky

Did you know that you can actually cause more static sound in your recordings when using a Pop Filter? That’s right! Pop Filter’s are a tool used by many singers to decrease the popping of air that flows into the mic. If a singer says a “P” or maybe a “T” to loud, it can cause the sound to pop in the recording leaving a horrible little peak in the end product that is very undesirable to most engineers.

 

 

 

Pop Filters are the way to isolate sound

Pop Filters are the way to isolate sound

The pop filter is a fantastic tool for eliminating this problem. But what most musicians do not know is where to put the pop filter. Pop Filters usually come with a convenient clasp on the end of an adjustable neck. You will see most engineers and producers attach it to the singers microphone stand and then swivel the adjustable neck so that the screen sits in front of the microphone, between the singer and the mic head. What they don’t realize though is that if the singer causes the pop filter to vibrate or if they tap it or hit it, that will travel through the adjustable arm and into the stand that is holding the microphone, hence transferring the sound right into the mic and into the recording! To avoid all that extra noise, simply place the pop filter on a mic stand next to the stand that is holding the mic… this way if the pop filter gets moved or jolted – the sound is eliminated from the microphone all together.

 

 

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Catch Mike on Mics at SoundCheck Music Center in Grass Valley, CA while he shares with us the Vocal Chain and all the parts that are important. Learn about applying pop filters, vocal pre-amps, equalizers, condensers, limiters and gates to vocals before getting them to the board or audience!

Watch the Video : Tech Talk – Vocal Chain Part One

Ray Charles on Mic

Ray Charles was notorious for using a condenser mic to capture his raw gritty sound